Category: Edition 1 - July 2004
 
 

Files:

pdf.png Editorial for Volume 4, Edition 1 (July 2004) - By Editor-in-Chief  

Download

This issue of the Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology is being released at a tumultuous time in modern history given the ongoing traumatic events in the Middle East, with little prospect of early resolution and the enormous sociological and psychological upheavals that this must bring for those individuals directly involved in the Middle East and Iraq conflict.  Given the “global village” in which we now increasingly live, few, if any, of us can remain untouched by occurrences in lands distant, especially when these tend to be of cataclysmic proportions. Accordingly, there is the ever-important need to understand human experience, thoughts, feelings and emotions not only in a fundamental (arguably, some might say, universalistic) way but also within their containing socio-political and cultural frameworks. ...


  Size
Downloads
153.63 KB
829

pdf.png BOOK REVIEW (by Rex van Vuuren) - Qualitative Research in Psychology: The Turning Point?  

Download

Paul M. Camic, Jean E. Rhodes and Lucy Yardley (Eds.). Qualitative Research in Psychology: Expanding perspectives in methodology and design (2003). Washington: American Psychological Association.
(ISBN 1-55798-979-6)
____________________
This review - penned by one of the journal’s editorial board members - is being published in the hope of stimulating debate around the issue of qualitative research in Psychology. This is especially important in view of the multiple methodologies that are prevalent within the broad scope of the social sciences and, equally important, the seemingly ever-changing methodological scenarios that do not necessarily usher in any paradigmatic changes.
Reader response is encouraged in the hope that a special issue dealing with Method in Phenomenology can be published in the short to medium term. [Editor-in-Chief]


  Size
Downloads
159.97 KB
1,363

pdf.png Phenomenology in Education: A Case Study in Education Leadership - By Hennie van der Mescht  

Download

This paper was penned by one of the journal's editorial board members with the aim of stimulating debate around the issue of using a phenomenological research paradigm in the study of education leadership. This is especially important in view of the multiple methodologies that are prevalent within the broad scope of the social sciences and, equally important, the seemingly ever-changing methodological scenarios that do not necessarily usher in any paradigmatic changes.
Reader response is encouraged in the hope that a special issue dealing with Phenomenology in Education can be published in the short to medium term. [Editor-in-Chief]


  Size
Downloads
277.81 KB
3,066

pdf.png From “The Things Themselves” to a “Feeling of Understanding”: Finding Different Voices in Phenomenological Research - By Peter Willis  

Download

This paper explores some of the ways in which phenomenological approaches have been linked to contemporary social science inquiry into human ways of knowing and learning in the fields of education and nursing research. It then looks at four contemporary approaches which draw on phenomenology namely: distinguishing imaginal from rational/logical knowing as an alternative and complementary mode of knowing; using ‘arts based' or ‘expressive' approaches to inquiry; developing hermeneutic text making to present research findings and using heuristics in a cyclical approach to understanding forms of human experience. The suggestion is that these approaches could be enriched and deepened by a more explicit exploration of phenomenological approaches and that conversely, some of forms of phenomenological research might be enriched by the use of these approaches.


  Size
Downloads
268.06 KB
1,715

pdf.png “Atmosphere”, a Precursor of “Cognitive Schemas”: Tracing Tacit Phenomenological Influences on Cognitive Behaviour Therapy - By Rodrigo Becerra  

Download

Whilst individuals deal with divergent sorts of stimuli from the environment, they also tend to display some regularity in the way they respond to related patterns. These consistent responses can be conceptualised as cognitive schemas. A paramount component of Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT) is the notion of cognitive schemas as they are a favoured point of therapeutic intervention. CBT as articulated by Beck in the 1960s owes intellectual acknowledgment to Merleau-Ponty and Heidegger and their notions of "atmosphere" and "clearing" respectively. This essay explores the notion of cognitive schema and atmosphere as applied to emotional pathology. It suggests that the well-known influence that phenomenology had on existential psychology could be extended to empirical clinical psychology, like CBT. The strategy adopted in this paper is to use Dreyfus' ontological and epistemological distinction in psychopathology and then make a similar distinction, albeit using different terminology, in the CBT tradition. Some empirical findings from the literature are examined which render support to the existence of cognitive schemas and their crucial contributory role in the aetiology and maintenance of emotional disorders. It is noted that some of the features of these cognitive schemas were espoused well before Beck by Merleau-Ponty and the phenomenological-existential tradition.


  Size
Downloads
221.1 KB
1,237

pdf.png The Wound that Connects: A Consideration of “Narcissism” and the Creation of Soulful Space - By Les Todres  

Download

This article develops an existential perspective on what has been called ‘narcissism'. Using both the psychoanalytic tradition and the literary myth of Narcissus as ‘touchstones', it unfolds a view of existential dilemmas and possibilities that are announced by this discourse. As such, it seeks to clarify the existential task of embodying human vulnerability - a journey that is potentially the source and depth of human compassion. With the help of the perspectives of A. H. Almaas and Eugene Gendlin, the phenomenon of ‘soulful space' is named, and pursued in both logical and evocative ways. 'Soulful space' is articulated as an existential achievement and an alternative response to the call of Narcissus: an embodiment of both vulnerability and freedom; a freedom-wound that grounds interpersonal empathy and openness.


  Size
Downloads
240.6 KB
1,468

pdf.png Chronic Pain and Returning to Learning: Exploring the Lived Experiences of Three Women - By Anita Sinner  

Download

An in-depth analysis of the post-secondary learning experiences of three women revealed that their decisions to participate in college and university courses in Canada were interconnected with lived experiences of chronic pain. A causal link between chronic pain and returning to learning was an unexpected outcome of a study focusing on women's learning experiences in post-secondary institutions. Each woman in this study learned to cope with and adapt to her chronic pain, and over time, returned to learning to undertake new areas of study to accommodate a redefinition of self based on chronic pain. Eventually chronic pain became a conduit to more positive experiences of learning and reflection. The role and meaning of chronic pain in the learning equation represents a blind spot in the existing educational literature and it is through such in-depth, descriptive stories of participants that we learn how this invisible barrier may influence the learning decisions of women.


  Size
Downloads
142.47 KB
1,527

pdf.png Patients’ Experience of the External Therapeutic Application of Ginger by Anthroposophically Trained Nurses - By Tessa Therkleson and Patricia Sherwood  

Download

There has been considerable public debate on a range of complementary health practices throughout the western world, perhaps especially in Australia, United States and Europe. Most often, the research critique of these practices is restricted to quantitative or non-user qualitative research methodologies. Consequently, there is a significant gap in the research profile of complementary health services that needs to be addressed particularly in view of the rapid and ongoing increase in the use of complementary services, even in the face of sometimes adverse media publicity. This paper demonstrates the contribution that phenomenologically-based research can make to fill this lacuna by explicating, in detail, the client experience of a complementary health practice. The paper explores patient experience of a ginger compress, as applied by anthroposophically trained nurses, to demonstrate various therapeutic effects. Four key themes emerged including an increase in warmth and internal activity in the major organs of the body, changes in thought-life and sensory perception along with a greater sense of well-being and self-focus with the perception of clearer personal boundaries. These themes, emerging from a patient sample in New Zealand, compared favourably to the Filderklinik Study completed in 1992 in a large German state hospital.


  Size
Downloads
234.61 KB
705

Copyright © IPJP 2017 All rights reserved

Creative Commons License [CC BY-NC-ND 4.0]

ISSN 1445-7377 (Online issues)

ISSN 2079-7222 (Print issues)

Powered by Web Guru

______________________ The Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology _____________________________

NISC logo small

The IPJP is published in association with

NISC (Pty) Ltd and Taylor & Francis

[ CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 ]

Routledge TF Group